Accents Publishing Blog
“Dust” by Nana Lampton
poem

Wash the Dust from My Eyes by Nana LamptonWash the dust from my eyes, out of my ears,
from all pores where the wind has lodged it.
Wash it away—whatever is left from dusty roads
of childhood Rockport, dust of dead parents.
Let me go to Mess Hall clean,
to feed as well as my horse
for tomorrow’s ride.
Break this monotony with abundant splashing
from fountains in Renaissance Rome.
Break this dead dusty road. I am going somewhere
lined with apple trees and red rose bushes.

NL

Nana Lampton
Wash the Dust from My Eyes
(Accents Publishing)


“Aunt Cordelia to John Mason” by Nana Lampton
poem

Wash the Dust from My Eyes by Nana LamptonYour father told you, you trust too much.
You believe the generals. French and Milner
for the British, Joffre for the French,
Von Kluck of Germany, speak of themselves
as well-schooled nobility, a notch under all-knowing,
bred of kings with better boot legs, finer noses,
better posture in the saddle.

Look at the results! They make their private decisions, so jealous
they won’t consult. One army passes another allied army
in the night, by mistake, squandering troops’ energy,
too late to reach the battle, to hold the line.
Soldiers march twice the needed distance.
Infantry—the lowly troop—lacks water, rest, and food,
expected to fight next morning. (This happens, I read,
more than once.) Exhausted soldiers die, wounded are left
behind—the victims of generals’ bull-fighting.
Joffre fires 58 generals.

For glory of the battle, the lances and the pennants fly,
horses leap the shell holes, until they, too, are
hanging their heads for lack of food and water.
Fodder follows a week late, across the sea, then by rail.

Look, John Mason, we have to stop this insanity!
Listen! You’re not any better bred than the fellows who
can’t speak the language, than recruits who
might be born a different color.
Pay attention! Find the meaning of your life.
You are training first generation boys.
Teach them to go forward as Americans,
with respect and common sense. One of them
could be President one day. Try not to lose him.

NL

Nana Lampton
Wash the Dust from My Eyes
(Accents Publishing)


“Wind-Slip Day” by Nana Lampton
poem

click for more info

Three ravens slip the wind
into the hayfield
to forage after the storm.

When the harbor smoothes,
I will paddle my kayak out to sea.
I am waiting out the wind
the way we endure slow time,
the end of marriage, a mother dying,
the way winter endures for spring,

or one alone patiently awaits the other.
What unfolds today will indicate
the weather, what the sea has in mind.

Nana Lampton,
Bloom on a Split Board
Accents Publishing


It Is Only Conscious Caring that Can Uplift Us: an Interview with Nana Lampton
Interview

Wash the Dust from My Eyes by Nana LamptonWash the Dust from My Eyes crosses genres, modes, and time periods. It has the sense of boundless nice. What was your process for creating this work like?

Recognizing there is a time stream, I thought of a young man preparing for war as the same for all wars.

At the heart of this story is love. It seeps into the language and reminds the reader that romantic love may only be a fraction of the depth of the emotion? How do you see love functioning in your work?

Given that our human race is bestial, territorial, and pugnacious, it is only conscious caring that can uplift us, one at a time. (more…)


Nana Lampton Reads and Signs at Carmichael’s Bookstore
Poetry Readings


Nana Lampton will be reading from Wash the Dust from My Eyes (Accents Publishing) tomorrow, Thursday February 18th at the Carmichael’s Bookstore on Frankfort Avenue in Louisville, Kentucky.

In the above video from WHAS11 (Louisville’s ABC affiliate), Nana talks about the book, which is based on the World War I experiences of her grandfather, cavalryman Dinwiddie Lampton. The book is available here, as well as at Carmichael’s bookstore, and it combines her grandfather’s journal entries, photographs, and poetry from Nana herself.

Relevant links:

When: Thursday, February 18, 2016 @ 7pm
Where: Carmichael’s Bookstore
2720 Frankfort Ave.
Louisville, KY 40206
(502) 896-6950

Nana Lampton Reading at Carnegie Center
Poetry Readings

Nana Lampton Reading on January 20th 2016 at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and LearningThis is the final reminder that Nana Lampton (author of Accents Published Wash the Dust from My Eyes and Bloom on a Split Board) will be reading tonight at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning in Lexington, Kentucky at 6pm.

Nana Lampton is CEO and chair of Hardscuffle, Inc. and American Life and Accident Insurance Company of Kentucky, and she’s the founder of the Snowy Owl Foundation. She recently spoke at the Network for Entrepreneurial Women’s annual NEW Showcase last year. Nana is also the 2013 winner of the 2013 Kentucky Governor’s Awards in Arts.

Wash the Dust from My Eyes is a multi-genre, hardbound book tells the story of her grandfather—a World War I cavalryman who is uncertain about the future of the war. The book also draws from Lucretius and includes photographs of her grandfather.

Copies of Wash the Dust from My Eyes are currently available from the Accents Store.

To visit the Facebook page for the event, click here.

When: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 @ 6pm
Where: The Carnegie Center
251 W. Second Street
Lexington, KY 40507
(859) 254-4175

Nana Lampton reads from Wash the Dust from My Eyes This Wednesday
Poetry Readings


Nana Lampton Reading on January 20th 2016 at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning

Copies of Wash the Dust from My Eyes are currently available from the Accents Store.

To visit the Facebook page for the event, click here.

When: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 @ 6pm
Where: The Carnegie Center
251 W. Second Street
Lexington, KY 40507
(859) 254-4175

“A Long Day Training” by Nana Lampton
poem

A long day across the prairie, riding for hours in formation.
Look at the light cape the shoulder of this fit horse. It radiates from
Rodney’s slick coat, then slips through the blowing grasses
for miles. Watching muscle move under fine hair, I am riding with
Alexander on the Persian campaign. Trained and worked, men and
horses move together through lands they only imagined.

Trotting the hour lulls me past the day’s soldier persona,
past sun-time and ego, to a day a thousand years ago
when I was a brave riding bareback, carrying a spear
fringed with dyed strips of buffalo hide, blessings
for hunting and battle. Once I was that native born warrior
watching muscle under shoulder ripple sunlight
from the horse’s slick coat. Lift me up, straighten me
in the saddle, we have a long way to go.

NL

Wash the Dust from My Eyes by Nana LamptonNana Lampton
Wash the Dust from My Eyes
(Accents Publishing)

NEWS: On January 20th, Nana Lampton will be hosting a reading from Wash the Dust from My Eyes at the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning in Lexington, KY. Click here for the Facebook Event page.


Wash the Dust From My Eyes Ships This Friday
news


Wash the Dust from My Eyes by Nana LamptonIf you’ve already ordered Nana Lampton’s multi-genre, hardcover collection Wash the Dust From My Eyes, it will ship this Friday, January 15th. If you haven’t pre-ordered a copy, copies are still available!

In this first-of-its-kind collection of nonfiction, poetry, art and photography 100 years in the making, Nana Lampton combines the journal entries of her grandfather—a World War I cavalryman uncertain about the future the war holds, yet ready to play his part—with her own poetry inspired by his writing. As she reaches back through a century to see the world from his perspective, Lampton invites the words of Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius to illustrate the timelessness of feelings that we can all appreciate—apprehension, ambition, camaraderie, and love—in the face of war and in the hope for what comes after.

What others are saying:

Nana Lampton creates a moving meditation on war and its brutal mechanization in the 20th century, capturing the idealism and dutifulness of the young, the tedium of camp life, and the anachronism of cavalry on the eve of ‘the war to end all wars.’ These voices, these poems, chime.

—Richard Taylor

 

Through John Mason’s history, we see the outer man of a cavalry captain training for the Great War. But through her poetry, we view also his imagined inner soul and the unimaginable horrors of war. The result is a powerful journey that all should take.

—James C. Klotter

 

Ultimately, these literal entries, ancient lines, and her lyrical envisioning of her grandfather’s life become one sinuous keening utterance of the desperation of man at war and the cherished triumph of love over all.

—Jeanie Thompson

To order, click here to go to the Accents Store.


“Wading In” by Nana Lampton
poem

click for more info

Next to nothing to enter the stream.
A light rod, waders against the cold,
a sense of how the salmon lie –
behind the rock in lesser current.
More than anything that weighs,
it’s the willingness to be half in darkness.
The feel of boot on rock is the way to see
below the surface.

I cross the river,
staff thrust downstream to prop my steps
against the current. At last
I stand firmly, to cast
where dark ripples meet lighter ones.

All that departs my sheathed self is filament with fly
patiently tied for dropping in
the river in disguise.
The rod no longer measures time or space.
It’s all in the meeting of stream currents.

Atlantic salmon, heavy with its ocean feed,
about to fast a year on its way up river,
waits for rain to fill its pool
before leaping to the next one.

The catch:
the long reeling
of this golden silver light moving in scales
formed as much by mind as water.

Nana Lampton,
Bloom on a Split Board
Accents Publishing