Accents Publishing Blog
Frederick Smock: The New Poet Laureate of Kentucky
Author Update



Frederick Smock, author of The Deer at Gethsemani: Ecologues, is the new Poet Laureate of Kentucky! The Kentucky Arts council made an announcement on Tuesday, April 18. Smock will officially be inducted on Kentucky Writers’ Day, which is May 1, 2017.

A new Poet Laureate is picked on every odd-numbered year. The honor of Poet Laureate has been held by a few Accents-published authors including George Ella Lyon, Frank X Walker, and Richard Taylor. The current Poet Laureate is George Ella Lyon.

Frederick Smock’s newest book, The Bounteous World, is currently available from Broadstone Books.


Spalding MFA Presents a Celebration of Kentucky Poets
Poetry Readings








On Sunday, the Spalding MFA in Writing will hold a reading by established poets from around the state, including Accents-published poets Jeremy Paden (Broken Tulips, 2013) and Frederick Smock (The Deer at Gethsemani: Eclogues, 2011). The event is part of a weekend-long celebration that includes a faculty reading on Saturday and an open house Sunday morning.

Readings will include:

Click here for event information from the Kentucky Literary Calendar.

When: Sunday, November 13, 2016 @ 5:30-6:45pm
Where: Spalding University
Egan Leadership Center
901 S 4th St
Louisville, KY 40507
(502) 873-4400

“II” by Frederick Smock
poem

click for more info

There was a gate,
old and green,
that swung in the wind.
No fence stretched away
on either side anymore,
if ever one had.
The gate stood alone,
open on the meadow,
a seamless drift of land.
To my eye, that gate
organized the whole field
of vision. Everything
circled around the gate,
or radiated out from it,
or passed through it.
Surely I could never think
of crossing that field
and not passing through.
There was an inevitability
to it, and a promise that,
after passing through,
something remarkable
was sure to be revealed
on the other side.

Frederick Smock,
The Deer at Gethsemani: Eclogues
Accents Publishing


“V” by Frederick Smock
poem

click for more info

The geese have returned again to campus,
to the roof of the library where they make their nest,
where they can look out over Beargrass Creek
and the elms of Creason Park.

What we do here is of no importance to them,
except perhaps when we exclaim over them
when they deign to stroll among us,
for they have always known what they need to know.

They stroll among us like foreign royalty.
We approach them as supplicants, small offerings
in our hands, and come away marveling.
Then, we return to our studies of theoretical things.


“IV” by Frederick Smock
poem

Deer at Gethsemani

Pigeons, their wings clasped
behind them, pace to and fro
on the window-ledge, darkly
muttering to themselves

about what we cannot know.
Even here, on the top floor
of a downtown Vancouver hotel,
with a lovely view of the harbor,

the boat-house in Stanley Park
and snow-capped mountains,
the pigeons pace up and down
in the green gathering dusk,

muttering to the gargoyles
who grin and, darkly, agree.

Frederick Smock,
The Deer at Gethsemani: Eclogues
Accents Publishing


“IV” by Frederick Smock
poem

Deer at GethsemaniPigeons, their wings clasped
behind them, pace to and fro
on the window-ledge, darkly
muttering to themselves

about what we cannot know.
Even here, on the top floor
of a downtown Vancouver hotel,
with a lovely view of the harbor,

the boat-house in Stanley Park
and snow-capped mountains,
the pigeons pace up and down
in the green gathering dusk,

muttering to the gargoyles
who grin and, darkly, agree.

Frederick Smock,
The Deer at Gethsemani: Eclogues
Accents Publishing

More from The Deer at Gethsemani:


“I” by Frederick Smock
poem

Deer at GethsemaniA sycamore tree
under the melting snow
becoming once again
branch by branch
itself

Frederick Smock,
The Deer at Gethsemani: Eclogues
Accents Publishing